Tag Archives: citizenship-based taxation

Cook v. Tait 22 – Kirsch Schneider – Toronto – Citizenship taxation debate

What follows are links to posts at the Isaac Brock Society discussion the Kirsch Schneider debate held in Toronto on May 2, 2014. The posts (which are rich with comments) include:

ACA Global Foundation – Video of Kirsch Schneider debate – March 2015

Live Comments of the Toronto Kirsch Schneider debate – May 2, 2014

More discussion of the May 2 Kirsch Schneider debate – May 3, 2014

The comments are fantastic! Great insight!

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Twas the night before #FATCA @TaxPolBlog interview – Mentions ADCS-ADSC.ca

This is a good interview with a mention of the FATCA Charter Challenge – covers a number of issues in a short period of time!

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Cook v. Tait 15: Why did the Soviet Union, Bulgaria, Vietnam and Myanmar adopt CBT? To maintain control?

 

Interesting commentary on citizenship-based taxation from Shadow Raider at the Isaac Brock Society and from Badger.

 

 

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Cook v. Tait 14: It’s NOT “citizenship-based taxation”, It’s “extraterritorial taxation”

The Cook v. Tait Series of Posts

boldlygo

In January of 2013 I began a series of posts to explore the rationale (if there is one) for  “citizenship-based taxation”. I simply cannot understand how the United States of America, a country that once was a leader in human rights, can treat it’s citizens (not to mention Green Card holders) so badly. I assume that Congress has simply not YET considered this issue.

This series of posts (including the Prologue are):

 

Cook v. Tait Prologue: Citizenship renunciations soaring under Obama – Renunciation as an Act of Self Defense

Cook v. Tait 1: Does Cook v. Tait really mean that citizenship-based taxation is constitutional in all cases?

Cook v. Tait 2: The presumption of government benefit

Cook v. Tait 3: Legal Scholar agrees justification in Cook v. Tait, but offers new justification for citizenship-based taxation

Cook v. Tait 4: Taxation of #Americansabroad based on US culture 150 years ago! Time warp or what!

Cook v. Tait 5: Citizenship-based taxation was never justified – League of Nations reports!

Cook v. Tait 6: Taxation of Green Card holders who reside outside the U.S.

Cook v. Tait 7: Equality: Law prohibits both rich and poor from sleeping on the park bench

Cook v. Tait 8: Does citizenship-based taxation cross the boundaries of tax justice?

Cook v. Tait 9:  US may have to stop citizenship-based taxation to get #FATCA IGAs

Cook v. Tait 10: Those born outside the U.S. to U.S. citizens, may not be U.S. citizens

Cook v. Tait 11: Who should #Americansabroad be compared to for tax purposes? Even U.S. citizens are entitle to “equal protection” under the 14th amendment

Cook v. Tait 12: Afroyim v. Rusk, The 14th amendment and the forcible destruction of citizenship

Cook v. Taint 13: The U.S. can no longer be permitted to levy taxes on the residents of other countries in general and border babies in particular

Cook v. Tait 14 – Boldly Go where no taxing authority has gone before

Cook v. Tait 15 – Why did the Soviet Union, Bulgaria, Vietnam and Myanmar adopt CBT? To maintain control.

Cook v. Tait 16 (Reblog of Tax-Expatriation.com post) Supreme Court’s Decision in Cook vs. Tait and Notification Requirement of Section 7701(a)(50)

 

The above tweet references the following comment to the Cook v. Tait 1 post.

 

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Cook v. Tait 13: The US can no longer be permitted to levy taxes on border babies living in Canada

Introduction – The Cook v. Tait Series of Posts

citizenship

In January of 2013 I began a series of posts to explore the rationale (if there is one) for  “citizenship-based taxation”. I simply cannot understand how the United States of America, a country that once was a leader in human rights, can treat it’s citizens (not to mention Green Card holders) so badly. I assume that Congress has simply not YET considered this issue.

This series of posts (including the Prologue are):

Cook v. Tait Prologue: Citizenship renunciations soaring under Obama – Renunciation as an Act of Self Defense

Cook v. Tait 1: Does Cook v. Tait really mean that citizenship-based taxation is constitutional in all cases?

Cook v. Tait 2: The presumption of government benefit

Cook v. Tait 3: Legal Scholar agrees justification in Cook v. Tait, but offers new justification for citizenship-based taxation

Cook v. Tait 4: Taxation of #Americansabroad based on US culture 150 years ago! Time warp or what!

Cook v. Tait 5: Citizenship-based taxation was never justified – League of Nations reports!

Cook v. Tait 6: Taxation of Green Card holders who reside outside the U.S.

Cook v. Tait 7: Equality: Law prohibits both rich and poor from sleeping on the park bench

Cook v. Tait 8: Does citizenship-based taxation cross the boundaries of tax justice?

Cook v. Tait 9:  US may have to stop citizenship-based taxation to get #FATCA IGAs

Cook v. Tait 10: Those born outside the U.S. to U.S. citizens, may not be U.S. citizens

Cook v. Tait 11: Who should #Americansabroad be compared to for tax purposes? Even U.S. citizens are entitle to “equal protection” under the 14th amendment

Cook v. Tait 12: Afroyim v. Rusk, The 14th amendment and the forcible destruction of citizenship

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Cook v Tait 13: Citizenship-based taxation must come to an end

The above tweet references a calm, but desperate plea posted at the Isaac Brock Society. The plea includes:

 

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At least the U.S. government has people thinking about the meaning of citizenship

When it’s all said and done, FATCA is likely to result in the rethinking of what citizenship means, how it is acquired, how it can be renounced and more.

Two recent articles on this topic:

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@HarvardIR article describes hardships of #Americansabroad suggests abolishing citizenship-based tax

Interesting article by by Jessica Dorfmann in the Harvard International Review. On the whole it is a very good article. After describing many of the specific hardships of U.S. citizenship abroad, It closes by saying:

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