Tag Archives: United Nations

Cook v. Tait 44: “Sovereignty”, “Citizenship” and use of “citizenship” to further the interests of the “sovereign” – The evolution from #CookvTait to #FATCA

As citizenship evolves …

I began this post in 2015. It has languished in draft form since that time. It is now November of 2017. As #TaxReform17 comes to an end, I feel motivated to finish it. It is now 2019. Really, it’s probably now or never. This post draws heavily from posts, insights and comments from a number of bloggers and (past) contributors to the Isaac Brock Society. Your comments have helped to shape this discussion. This post will continue my Cook v. Tait Book (a collection of posts written about U.S. citizenship based taxation taxation-based citizenship, which started in 2011. (Much of the Cook v. Tait book appears as a resource at the Isaac Brock Society – a rich source of comments about life in an FBAR and FATCA world.

About citizenship: One way or the other, citizenship matters ..

The purpose of this post is to explore various aspects of the concept of citizenship through the 20th century and the first part of the 21st century. This is an interesting topic in it’s own right. It is particularly important in the context of Cook v. Tait. As the likelihood of a lawsuit against “citizenship-based taxation” increases, the importance of understanding “the evolution of citizenship” increases. I propose to consider this issue under the following “Part”s:

Part A –  Citizenship under international law – An aspect of the Sovereignty of Nations

Part B – Citizenship, international law and citizenship evolution triggered by “war”

Part C – Evolution of citizenship under U.S. “domestic law” – 1967 – Afroyim – The U.S. Supreme Court and the “constitutionalism” of U.S. citizenship

Part D – Notions of Citizenship in the 21st Century

Part E – The forced imposition of U.S. citizenship

Part F – Citizenship as a weapon – The role of “citizenship taxation” in the “weaponization of finance”

Part G – Citizenship-based taxation as a way of controlling the life choices of Americans abroad

Part H – Citizenship-based taxation as a mechanism to export U.S. cultural values to the rest of the world

Part I – Dual citizenship in a world of U.S. extra-territorial laws

Part J – Citizenship-based taxation as a way to export U.S. cultural values to the Muslim world

Part K – Multiple citizenships and public office: Australia’s “Citizenship Seven”

Appendix – Modern thinking and research on the rights and obligations of citizenship

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